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Sunday, April 19, 2015

Xenophobic: South African shop owner killed by armed mobs attacking immigrant-owned shops (Photos)

Victim: A shop owner believed to be from Mozambique (pictured) has died from his injuries amid the xenophobic violence that has gripped South Africa
 A bloody and wounded shop owner has been pictured just moments before he died from his injuries on another day of xenophobic attacks in South Africa.

The man who is believed to be from Mozambique was taken to a hospital in Johannesburg where he tragically passed away.

At least six people have been killed and many thousands displaced from their homes since the violence against immigrants erupted in the city of Durban several weeks ago.


Despite making 30 arrests overnight, police are struggling to subdue the machete-wielding gangs who ransacked immigrant-owned shops in the slums of Johannesburg.

Many families in the city who now fear for their lives have abandoned their homes and fled to a makeshift refugee camp which lies just east of Johannesburg.

South Africa's President Jacob Zuma has called for an end to the 'shocking and unacceptable' attacks on immigrants from Africa and South Asia, saying: 'No amount of frustration and anger can ever justify the attacks on foreign nationals.'

There was a heavy police presence in the Alexandra township as armed rioters looted shops, burned tires and built street barricades overnight. And armed policeman fired rubber bullets at the groups who have torched shops and cars in the poor areas of Johannesburg in recent days.


Police claim that attacks on immigrants - many of whom are from other African countries - have largely subsided in the country's east where the violence began.

With unemployment and poverty levels high in the country, some South Africans have accused the immigrants of taking jobs and opportunities away from them.

A police spokesman said the 30 people arrested in Johannesburg overnight will be charged for 'public violence, malicious damage to property, house breaking and theft'.

Thousands of foreigners in the country have fled their homes and the country amid the violence, escaping to makeshift camps as well as neighbouring countries like Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique.

Looted: A woman sifts through the remains of the ransacked store she was renting to foreign nationals who are now being targeted by violent groups in Johannesburg
The surge of violence against immigrants is widely blamed on a speech made by King Goodwill Zwelithini, a traditional Zulu leader who blamed the foreigners living South Africa for its high crime rate and said they must 'take their bags and go'.

He has been accused of 'igniting' the Zulus who comprise one of South Africa's largest ethnic groups by saying 'we must deal with our own lice' in a speech broadcast by a local radio station.

The King has since said his words were misinterpreted but for some, Zwelithini simply articulated what many were feeling.



There was a heavy police presence in the Alexandra township as armed rioters looted shops, burned tires and built street barricades overnight. And armed policeman fired rubber bullets at the groups who have torched shops and cars in the poor areas of Johannesburg in recent days.

Police claim that attacks on immigrants - many of whom are from other African countries - have largely subsided in the country's east where the violence began.

With unemployment and poverty levels high in the country, some South Africans have accused the immigrants of taking jobs and opportunities away from them.

A police spokesman said the 30 people arrested in Johannesburg overnight will be charged for 'public violence, malicious damage to property, house breaking and theft'.

Protection: Foreign nationals who fear for their lives have gathered at a relief camp (pictured) set up in Primrose, East of Johannesburg
Thousands of foreigners in the country have fled their homes and the country amid the violence, escaping to makeshift camps as well as neighbouring countries like Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique.

The surge of violence against immigrants is widely blamed on a speech made by King Goodwill Zwelithini, a traditional Zulu leader who blamed the foreigners living South Africa for its high crime rate and said they must 'take their bags and go'. 

He has been accused of 'igniting' the Zulus who comprise one of South Africa's largest ethnic groups by saying 'we must deal with our own lice' in a speech broadcast by a local radio station.

The King has since said his words were misinterpreted but for some, Zwelithini simply articulated what many were feeling.

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